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Connecting Contractions

Sometimes we know what apostrophe’s are and sometimes we think they are commas that got away. But when it comes down to taking out a letter, or two or more, we throw that old friend in the air to signal that something is missing. When using contractions, we are taking two words and pushing them together as  concept can be easy to grasp but often times the students keep reading the contracted word as two separate words. When reading it’s, they are often saying it is. Sometimes when breaking things down we only make it that more confusing. So I like to take a few different approaches to concepts and grammatical tools to fully develop the thought process.  

When looking at contractions that end in “d” we are getting more difficult. Because many words end in “d” so it’s important to read through the whole sentence to understand where it’s going and which word will fit best. It’s also good to point out that you’re taking away way more than just 1-2 letters for these types of contractions. We practiced these choices more together to wrap our brains around these potential rule breakers. 

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Actions Speak Louder Than (Other) Words

What are you doing right now? Thinking, writing/typing, sitting, breathing, blinking….those are verbs. Those action words that get us up and moving.those helping words that motivate and encourage us to build with ourselves and our words. 

Parts of speech are often left by the way side with ELL students because they are only learning in the United States for so long. But it’s also an important task to take on with any student who is fairly fluent with their writing and understand basic grammar and punctuation rules. It’s just good to know the difference between nouns and verbs. I usually don’t express that every sentence needs a subject noun and verb because that’s just beyond their reach at this point in their education. But knowing the difference between action words and people, places, things , and ideas are a terrific place to start adding to that learning curve and further develop their thinking. 


After brainstorming various verbs together, students worked on reading through sentences and deciphering which words are verbs. Many times we found ourselves asking questions like “who is doing what?” or “what is happening here?” These questions helped the students to read closer as to what actions are actually taking place in each sentence they read. Students then got to write a sentence of their own being conscious of their use of verbs as they go. Verb usage was never an issue before, other than subject verb agreements–but that’s an issue with most people learning a new language. It’s all a part of the learning process.