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Graphic Organizers Galore!

If I can organize my thoughts, ideas, questions, feelings into graphics, then I’m all about it. Language learning is so much more enriching when pictures can be associated to word concepts. Sometimes it takes a short video clip to see the concept in motion or maybe an action that can be associated with the meaning of the word. All of these elements, whether used alone or in combination, help to further instill language and new terminology. 

We can talk all day about healthy foods and read about eating a rainbow of foods. But it doesn’t really help us if we only know a few of each colored food. I created this food color wheel to go along with our book from Reading A to Z, A Rainbow of Foods. I put up a picture of some colorful foods, we referenced our book and completed this healthy food wheel. This helped my students a lot with more ways to eat healthy and better snack choices. 

This organizer came straight from the Reading A to Z activities with the non-fiction text, The Foods We Eat. In this text we learned about where different foods come from and how they are made. Students had to brainstorm some of their favorite foods and figure out if they were plant eaters or meat eaters. Again associating a word with a picture and even a partial definition in this case with explaining the where. Some students took it a step further by telling where exactly their food came from.  

A story we read from the My Sidewalks on Reading Street collection had a similar picture that I drew up as a labeling activity. The book had this diagram at the end of the section for students to look over and read. I created this document for the students to physically label the plant parts between a flower and a vegetable. This activity was completed with first graders but can easily be modified for up to third grade, depending on how many parts you’d like to label.  

Not every graphic organizer has to include graphics. Sometimes just the movement and separation of words and phrases gives the visual or kinesthetic learner a different approach to understanding. This is where good old Venn diagrams,  t-charts, or KWL (know, want, learned) charts come in handy.

These types of graphic organizers are my absolute fave! They are so versatile and of course can be tailored to anyone’s needs. I first discovered them through Vocabulary A to Z, a branch of the Reading A to Z collection. Sometimes I choose the words to be defined and other times I make a list of vocab words for the students to pick the words they need a more clear understanding of. Students look up images on Google, our text, or from our discussions. For the more advanced students, we take our words and illustrations to the next level by writing a sentence about them.  

And then there are always more graphic organizers that are just more visually pleasing ways to share and keep track of information. Sometimes it’s good to physically see the connections between different things and how they correlate with like topics. Other times it’s good to make a timeline or number line to list out events in chronological order to get a grasp on time itself and the significance of events. 

Whatever works best for your students and you is something to take and run with.  My personal favorite is the vocab words with matching illustrations, which can be used across the board in various content areas and learning abilities.  I hope this blog will help you and your students to further develop language skills and comprehension overall. These are definetly big hits with my kiddos. 

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Satisfying a Masterpiece

This creative art piece was created by all of our ELL students as a gift to our beloved ELL teacher that is retiring. The concepts were brought together by two fourth grade students. One had the idea of color where the other had ideas of clouds, land, and a dark circular void in the middle of it all. We were able to combine those ideas into a large scale stained glass window design. Using pieces of colored broken glass we began laying the ground works for our masterpiece. As the day went on, we got students from each grade level to join in with laying the glass.

Dr. Gennie is the real mastermind when it comes to creating stained glass art. She carefully showed each student the ropes of each step of the window design, the layout, glueing all the pieces, to the grout work, polishing the entire piece, and of course giving it a name. We assigned different tasks to each grade level. Our kindergarten friends helped name the masterpiece, “Piece by Peace.” Our first graders helped to shine and polish the beautiful work. Much of the glueing took place by the careful hands of our third and fourth graders.

Silicone is used to adhere the glass pieces to the window. We used Popsicle sticks to spread the silicone onto the glass then carefully place the pieces back in their rightful place on the window. It is a tedious task that our wonderful third and fourth graders excelled at. The next step is adding the grout in between the pieces of glass to really hold everything in. Once the grout is inserted, it’s time to polish the masterpiece and do the clean up work. Cleanup work had to be completed by teachers since you have to use x-acto knives to dig out excess grout and silicone. We used water and wool socks to shine the glass and clean the window frame.