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Graphic Organizers Galore!

If I can organize my thoughts, ideas, questions, feelings into graphics, then I’m all about it. Language learning is so much more enriching when pictures can be associated to word concepts. Sometimes it takes a short video clip to see the concept in motion or maybe an action that can be associated with the meaning of the word. All of these elements, whether used alone or in combination, help to further instill language and new terminology. 

We can talk all day about healthy foods and read about eating a rainbow of foods. But it doesn’t really help us if we only know a few of each colored food. I created this food color wheel to go along with our book from Reading A to Z, A Rainbow of Foods. I put up a picture of some colorful foods, we referenced our book and completed this healthy food wheel. This helped my students a lot with more ways to eat healthy and better snack choices. 

This organizer came straight from the Reading A to Z activities with the non-fiction text, The Foods We Eat. In this text we learned about where different foods come from and how they are made. Students had to brainstorm some of their favorite foods and figure out if they were plant eaters or meat eaters. Again associating a word with a picture and even a partial definition in this case with explaining the where. Some students took it a step further by telling where exactly their food came from.  

A story we read from the My Sidewalks on Reading Street collection had a similar picture that I drew up as a labeling activity. The book had this diagram at the end of the section for students to look over and read. I created this document for the students to physically label the plant parts between a flower and a vegetable. This activity was completed with first graders but can easily be modified for up to third grade, depending on how many parts you’d like to label.  

Not every graphic organizer has to include graphics. Sometimes just the movement and separation of words and phrases gives the visual or kinesthetic learner a different approach to understanding. This is where good old Venn diagrams,  t-charts, or KWL (know, want, learned) charts come in handy.

These types of graphic organizers are my absolute fave! They are so versatile and of course can be tailored to anyone’s needs. I first discovered them through Vocabulary A to Z, a branch of the Reading A to Z collection. Sometimes I choose the words to be defined and other times I make a list of vocab words for the students to pick the words they need a more clear understanding of. Students look up images on Google, our text, or from our discussions. For the more advanced students, we take our words and illustrations to the next level by writing a sentence about them.  

And then there are always more graphic organizers that are just more visually pleasing ways to share and keep track of information. Sometimes it’s good to physically see the connections between different things and how they correlate with like topics. Other times it’s good to make a timeline or number line to list out events in chronological order to get a grasp on time itself and the significance of events. 

Whatever works best for your students and you is something to take and run with.  My personal favorite is the vocab words with matching illustrations, which can be used across the board in various content areas and learning abilities.  I hope this blog will help you and your students to further develop language skills and comprehension overall. These are definetly big hits with my kiddos. 

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Connecting Contractions

Sometimes we know what apostrophe’s are and sometimes we think they are commas that got away. But when it comes down to taking out a letter, or two or more, we throw that old friend in the air to signal that something is missing. When using contractions, we are taking two words and pushing them together as  concept can be easy to grasp but often times the students keep reading the contracted word as two separate words. When reading it’s, they are often saying it is. Sometimes when breaking things down we only make it that more confusing. So I like to take a few different approaches to concepts and grammatical tools to fully develop the thought process.  

When looking at contractions that end in “d” we are getting more difficult. Because many words end in “d” so it’s important to read through the whole sentence to understand where it’s going and which word will fit best. It’s also good to point out that you’re taking away way more than just 1-2 letters for these types of contractions. We practiced these choices more together to wrap our brains around these potential rule breakers. 

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Actions Speak Louder Than (Other) Words

What are you doing right now? Thinking, writing/typing, sitting, breathing, blinking….those are verbs. Those action words that get us up and moving.those helping words that motivate and encourage us to build with ourselves and our words. 

Parts of speech are often left by the way side with ELL students because they are only learning in the United States for so long. But it’s also an important task to take on with any student who is fairly fluent with their writing and understand basic grammar and punctuation rules. It’s just good to know the difference between nouns and verbs. I usually don’t express that every sentence needs a subject noun and verb because that’s just beyond their reach at this point in their education. But knowing the difference between action words and people, places, things , and ideas are a terrific place to start adding to that learning curve and further develop their thinking. 


After brainstorming various verbs together, students worked on reading through sentences and deciphering which words are verbs. Many times we found ourselves asking questions like “who is doing what?” or “what is happening here?” These questions helped the students to read closer as to what actions are actually taking place in each sentence they read. Students then got to write a sentence of their own being conscious of their use of verbs as they go. Verb usage was never an issue before, other than subject verb agreements–but that’s an issue with most people learning a new language. It’s all a part of the learning process. 

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Satisfying a Masterpiece

This creative art piece was created by all of our ELL students as a gift to our beloved ELL teacher that is retiring. The concepts were brought together by two fourth grade students. One had the idea of color where the other had ideas of clouds, land, and a dark circular void in the middle of it all. We were able to combine those ideas into a large scale stained glass window design. Using pieces of colored broken glass we began laying the ground works for our masterpiece. As the day went on, we got students from each grade level to join in with laying the glass.

Dr. Gennie is the real mastermind when it comes to creating stained glass art. She carefully showed each student the ropes of each step of the window design, the layout, glueing all the pieces, to the grout work, polishing the entire piece, and of course giving it a name. We assigned different tasks to each grade level. Our kindergarten friends helped name the masterpiece, “Piece by Peace.” Our first graders helped to shine and polish the beautiful work. Much of the glueing took place by the careful hands of our third and fourth graders.

Silicone is used to adhere the glass pieces to the window. We used Popsicle sticks to spread the silicone onto the glass then carefully place the pieces back in their rightful place on the window. It is a tedious task that our wonderful third and fourth graders excelled at. The next step is adding the grout in between the pieces of glass to really hold everything in. Once the grout is inserted, it’s time to polish the masterpiece and do the clean up work. Cleanup work had to be completed by teachers since you have to use x-acto knives to dig out excess grout and silicone. We used water and wool socks to shine the glass and clean the window frame.

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Eat the Rainbow


It’s important to eat a rainbow of healthy foods each and everyday. But why is it so important? What foods are considered healthy? How can we enjoy more of a rainbow when we eat? After reading the story “A Rainbow of Foods” we have been discussing these same questions and more. The story broke down many different fruits and vegetables that we commonly see and enjoy. The text told us what great things these healthy foods do for our bodies and how we can better ourselves. But are those the ONLY healthy foods we should enjoy? We made a wheel of colorful healthy foods that we can eat to keep our bodies strong and our minds working sharp. We used our book and the food rainbow above to help inspire our healthy foods quest.

More about emphasizing the importance of eating healthy foods of a variety of colors. Because each color of foods does different things for our bodies. And that’s important because our bodies do SO many different things every single day!

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Lost & Found Alphabet Soup

It’s a beautiful thing when you’re beginning kiddos learn their ABCs. The little light bulb gets its shine and calls out to the world that we are learners and we can read. This is such a crucial part of learning language for anyone. And there’s only so many ways you can do it, so I’m always looking for something new to further understanding. I gave my kiddos sets of alphabet letters of different styles and sizes to sort. From the mess of letters they find their alphabet to build. While searching for their letters, some students may sing the alphabet, some can go off just the last few, while others may need a little assistance. Either way they have a blast working together or individually to build their own alphabet. It’s like a scavenger hunt!

These two students started off each with their own alphabet, one with capital letters and the other with lowercase. They realized they were missing some letters and decided to combine their alphabet. The kids really enjoy this learning experience because of its puzzle/competitive nature and sequencing. It’s a puzzle they know how to solve just by finding the pieces and putting them in the correct order. Students were calling out letters with their sounds and digging through the letter until they found their true calling.

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Building Up Our Word Count

Redundantly putting together, sounding out, and stretching CVC words in order to build up our word count. We can read simple words and rhyme, but putting the letters together and really feeling for every letter sound changes the dynamic. It’s one thing to rhyme words and write out CVC word patterns for those rhyming -am, -at, -ed, etc. but to physically move around the letters to build words tends to change their thinking. This really peaks the interest of those kinesthetic and visual learners to physically grasp the concept of building words and sounds them out. When we can touch the letters and really think about the sounds they make that makes a difference when we go back to pencil and paper writing.

Students worked on building their words independently with some scaffolding on my part. Often times students would ask me to double check a word they had spelled or even to read their words aloud to me.  After we were all finished spelling words, each student read their words aloud.